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Snobs and Fast Food

I’m a big fan of Penn and Teller: Bullshit and the movie Fat Head, a follow up to SuperSize Me for a couple of reasons. One of which: I’m absolutely sick of people telling me how to live my life. Watch a couple episodes of Bullshit, and you’ll see how people that want to tell other people what to do are mostly pretentious assholes with an endless supply of cash. They’ll argue that fast food companies are tricking people into eating the food because it’s cheap and we’re stupid. Well, they got one thing right: it’s cheap. Yes, for most of these snobs, it’s hard to see what life’s like in another person’s shoes, and food is expensive. Not everyone can afford to buy all natural food, especially for an entire family. Not to mention that most expensive restaurants serve meals with higher calories than fast food. And whenever a person who wants people to make decisions for themselves comes on the show, they don’t present their ideas in a way to make you feel stupid, they do it in a way to make you think differently. You made the decision to eat the food; McDonalds did not drag you in. Beyond that, I don’t understand why fast food and soda companies are the only ones being scolded. Why not target ramen companies for selling salty soups at insanely cheap prices?
People that want the government to tell us what to do scare the shit out of me. We were all told at a young age to mind our own business, and that’s just what other people need to do. Who cares what I eat, or if I smoke cigarettes (not that I do), or if think people should be free to make whatever choice they want to make? This is America. While freedom of speech protects those that want to protest against fast food, you are still free to purchase whatever you want. Don’t limit the rest of the nation just because you don’t like something. It’s either all okay, or none of it is. The same goes for censorship too, but that’s a rant for another day.

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